Kids with lower vocabularies using e-books learn more with adult than pre-recorded voice


Ok, here are not unexpected results from research, but it is still important to trust (or in this case expect) but verify. Books are books, be they ebooks, popup books or printed chapter books, and with books interaction helps, creates more engagement and motivation. What I'm hoping from this is also the research on the books without parent (or other person) interaction, then does having the book read itself help there. Reading to children is great, but not all adults do read to their children, and many children live in a text sparse environment.  Does the book reading aloud help those students with the lower vocabulary when there is no one to read to them? As for comprehension, the study also found that the "children with above-average vocabularies did well on the camouflage post-test regardless of whether the adult or the book read to them." But again, what about a non-read to group? Well ebook research continues.



http://www.maryrvogt.com


Kids with lower vocabularies using e-books learn more with adult than pre-recorded voice

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO
https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2016-12/uot-sfc120516.php 

Overall, preschoolers learned about camouflage from both books. But, when researchers divided the four-year-olds into two groups - one group with children of higher than average vocabulary level, and one group of children with average and lower English vocabularies - they found that the children with average and lower English vocabularies showed poorer comprehension when the book read itself.

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