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Art project VII

The ongoing adaptation of art which "used" to include books and now will have ebook devices.

Perhaps not classic art, but changing a magazine ad from the early 1920s to include ebooks as gifts. This picture didn't actually have books in it, but the packages that were on the chair reminded me of the boxes my ebooks came in. 





And of course not only people interact with books, pets to too.

Frank Paton's 1880 painting Tearaway with an iPad showing a textbook. 



John Henry Dolph's 1881 painting The Scholar on a Kobo




Art Project VI

The ongoing adaptation of art which "used" to include books and now will have ebook devices.


Amelia Jan Murray's Faries on a Book (1820s), now on a Kindle Oasis
Ludwig Deutsch's The Scholars (1901) now with an iPad 

Henry Lewis Stephens' untitled (1863) of a man reading a newspaper, now reading a Kindle Fire.


Banned books 2018

Last month had the Banned Books Week, and it made me think about all the good books that others don't want to exist. I agree that there are many books that I don't like, but just because I don't like them doesn't mean that there isn't someone who does like them. I always feel bad about disposing of a book, even one that I find in the road that has been run over a few times.

But in case you missed it, there was a nice Humble Book Bundle of Forbidden reading (https://www.humblebundle.com/books/forbidden-books-2018)  and it is surprising how many banned books have ended up as commonly required reading lists.  So if you want to try some banned reading, you might go over to Project Gutenberg (https://www.gutenberg.org/) to download a copy of a required but banned reading.





And while it wasn't banned officially it would have had problems was Andy Weir's great book The Martian. So many teachers and students wanted to read it in class and discuss the wonderful scien…

When Science Fiction Become Reality

Back in 1997 Charles Sheffield and Jerry Pournelle (in the style of R.A. Heinlein) wrote a "juvenile" science fiction series with the central characters being young adults. These books used real science as did the R.A. Heinlein ones. In one of the books, Higher Education, a large part of the focus on the education system. As part of that story the students in school didn't read their books, instead, they watched videos and had electronic readers read the books aloud to them. So it looks like to some extent we are now approaching that science fiction waypoint, as now less than half prefer to read a textbook versus watching a video of the content. This could also mean that we need to work harder to make the books more enjoyable and understandable. I can say that as a science teacher, especially when teaching in middle school, I and my students would become frustrated with our textbooks, as most science textbooks were written two grade levels above the grade that they were…

A Problem of Paper (or Paper, we don't need no stinking papers)

Ok, this has been an interesting kind of converse experiment, and an unintended one too. What had happened was this, I had a book that I had purchased, a paper printed book, that had been sitting on my shelf for quite a while that I started to read the other day. Now the resulting experience has been a surprise to me. I normally read over 100 books a year, but for at least the last four years none of the novels or other tradebooks that I've read has been on paper, instead they have all been through electronic means. Which does mean that I've become very comfortable with my ereader (usually my Kindle) as a method of reading.  And I know that more and more people are reading text from screens, but that includes things like google search results and email. Even my students have commented that once they start noticing much of what they read is on the screen, but for most of them pleasure reading is still something done with paper.

As a proponent of differentiation I do try to get…

Try the Settings - Find your Goldilocks Zone

This last semester I was teaching a graduate technology and literacy course. As part of that course all my students were to do some action research. We did get some great results, for example one student’s work on using refreshable braille display for elementary children which saw an improved fluency of 4-5 letters per minute over those just using embossed paper, and another student I was working with developed her project on guided writing, saw an overall writing increase of 50% in just a few weeks using Google Docs as a writing system tool. The one though that I wanted to talk about here though was one student who was doing his action research on himself, to try and get better at reading from an ebook. He does great with paper, but found that he had trouble focusing with reading with technology. In his final report he had a number of things that he found that are of interest:

"During this process I learned that I read materials online a lot more then I originally thought. I rea…